Academic

Matthew Strohl’s academic page

I’m more than a decade out of grad school and I’m just now getting around to setting up an academic web page. Self-promotion has always been my least favorite part of academia, but here we are. I’ll try to get this in better shape at some point, but for now I’ve finally uploaded most of my work to Philpapers:

https://philpapers.org/s/Matthew%20Strohl

And here’s a brief bio and description of what I’m working on nowadays:

I finished my Ph.D at Princeton University in 2008 and took a tenure track job at the University of Montana in Missoula, where I still work today.  I have a longstanding interest in Ancient Greek theories of pleasure, which I believe are still stunningly vital and illuminating. My dissertation was about Aristotle’s theory of pleasure and I have since published two papers on the subject (archived on Philpapers). In the years since I finished grad school, I have migrated into Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Art. I really enjoy working in this area and I find it very liberating to do more exploratory systematic work. I also love the community of philosophers who work in aesthetics, and I’ve even come to look forward to the conferences (after attending exactly zero conferences my first five years out of grad school).

My work in aesthetics has been eclectic. I collaborated with Thi Nguyen (Utah Valley University) on a paper on cultural appropriation that was published recently in Philosophical Studies. Carrying over my interest in pleasure from my work in Ancient, I’ve written about hedonic ambivalence and the question of how negative emotion can figure positively in the appreciation of art. I have lifelong interests in film and food, and I’ve enjoyed the opportunity to tie these interests in with my academic work. I have a forthcoming paper in the Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism on culinary authenticity (look for it in May 2019). I am honored to blog about aesthetics regularly over at Aesthetics for Birds.

I am currently working on a project about aesthetic weakness of will and difficult art. I’m hoping to write something about camp and good-bad movies after that, and I have a long-gestating idea about the role of genre in creativity that I hope to bring to fruition sooner or later.